A friends Rifle.....

cloverleaf

Handloader
Sep 10, 2006
3,977
367
So- almost a year ago I lost a friend and shooting/ hunting partner to cancer. Since then I have been working on this Model 99 Savage in 250-3000 Savage takedown. Many of you know, as he did that I have been messing around with this caliber fro many years. He came into possession of the rifle after Cabela's "low balled" the previous owner due to some stock damage. (Some one actually used a nail to poke there name in the stock- kinda like the old copper or tin work we did as kids) When the guy refused Cabela's ridiculous offer, my friend followed him out of the store and offered to buy it from him. First thing to do was get it cleaned up, but other than the bore it wasnt bad. The bore was long neglected and looked more like well pipe than a barrel, (literally no rifling was visible in places) Wipe Out saved the day again. Lots of just crud later, the old rifle actually has a good bore. I would guess there is a possibility the rifle was re- blued since if my research is correct it could be 100 years old, and it appears to have been blued over some pitting. Case coloring on the lever is still visible.
As I noted, the wood work is another story. In addition to the "wood peckering" of the name in the stock, there is the typical crack to the wrist. The forend has been split and repaired, Poorly glued and held together with what appear to be filed off square nails. Its solid, but dosent look like new any more. Lots of character which I really like.
Half a dozen rounds down the bore at 50 yards confirmed two things. One, everything worked, and two my eyes are starting to tell my age. Sighting with thing was strictly a "best guess" proposition. The old rifle was drilled and tapped for a receiver sight from the factory. But scopes have always been my thing, and a receiver sight wasn't cheap either. I had my first Weaver when I was 12. But what to do... I couldn't bring myself to have it drilled and tapped. I Started looking at scope mounts and found the Stith type but they were rare and also expensive. Eventually I came across a post some where that mentioned a "Lightfoot mount". I contacted the poster and was eventually able to get in touch wit the person who made them. He can be contacted here <lightfootmount@gmail.com>. Great guy, makes the mount by having extensions welded to a factory "drill and tap" mount. He then sits down with his pattern action and files each one to fit. The front extension screws to a drilled and tapped dovetail that replaces the rear sight and is held in place with a set screw in addition to the dovetail fit. The rear extension is held in place with the receiver sight screws in the rear tang. He describes it as his "retirement job" and has several hundred to his credit. Tired of typing.... more n this one later. But here's a teaser...
 

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DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,460
2,229
That is a neat project, Troy. It can be great fun to work with some of the older firearms. It certainly honours your friend to work with the rifle that he purchased. What a great memorial, and how much greater when you bring the task to completion.
 

filmjunkie4ever

Handloader
May 4, 2011
1,466
101
You gotta love those old Savage rifles! Although I’ve never owned one of either, if I get another Savage 99 rifle, it will be in .243 or .250-3000 caliber.

Edit: I currently own 2, one in .300 Savage and the other is .308 WCF.
 

hunter24605

Handloader
Apr 30, 2016
1,616
1,487
Very cool old 99…I’m most impressed with having the initiative to work on it. I have a couple old long guns I bought to “fix up” but never built up enough steam to start on them 😏
 

RL338

Handloader
Mar 23, 2017
922
958
Growing up I had a great uncle that hunted with one of them. He always referred to it as an .250-3000 , being young I wondered what kind of name for a cartridge is that.
 

cloverleaf

Handloader
Sep 10, 2006
3,977
367
Thanks for the kind words guys. I hope to get a"name plate" made with his name and DOB and passing. That has been a challenge as I dont want to use new shinny brass. I would then inlay that in the stock over the "wood peckered" name. (I assume of some previous owner). ant really afford to just straight up have it engraved and color case hardened, That would be cool. we will see.
 

cloverleaf

Handloader
Sep 10, 2006
3,977
367
Almost forgot.... because the old gal is a 1:14 twist, I decided I had better do some reloading too. So far:
Found some 87 gr Speer Hot Cores. Loaded them in some once fired brass, over 39.5 grains of IMR 4350 and a CCI 200 primer. Used them for sight in and
to shoot the groups below.



This may just be "good enough". 2 groups around an inch, from a 100 year old rifle and a 40+ year old 4X Weaver, from this operator on any given day may just be good enough.
The "cheek riser" was also a neat experience. I did the leather work myself, but when I wanted to have some stitching done, I found a local craftsman who runs one of the few remaining shoe repair shops in the metro area. "Mike" is up into his 70's and still working every day. It was a privilege to meet him and get to visit with him a little bit. So much knowledge and skill there....I found myself wanting to be his apprentice, and learn from him...
 

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SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,398
757
That’s a great rifle buddy. I always have my open for a good 250 Savage M99. I have a Ruger bolt gun but I’d really like to have one of the 99’s.
 

Hoppy

Beginner
Aug 26, 2022
7
12
So- almost a year ago I lost a friend and shooting/ hunting partner to cancer. Since then I have been working on this Model 99 Savage in 250-3000 Savage takedown. Many of you know, as he did that I have been messing around with this caliber fro many years. He came into possession of the rifle after Cabela's "low balled" the previous owner due to some stock damage. (Some one actually used a nail to poke there name in the stock- kinda like the old copper or tin work we did as kids) When the guy refused Cabela's ridiculous offer, my friend followed him out of the store and offered to buy it from him. First thing to do was get it cleaned up, but other than the bore it wasnt bad. The bore was long neglected and looked more like well pipe than a barrel, (literally no rifling was visible in places) Wipe Out saved the day again. Lots of just crud later, the old rifle actually has a good bore. I would guess there is a possibility the rifle was re- blued since if my research is correct it could be 100 years old, and it appears to have been blued over some pitting. Case coloring on the lever is still visible.
As I noted, the wood work is another story. In addition to the "wood peckering" of the name in the stock, there is the typical crack to the wrist. The forend has been split and repaired, Poorly glued and held together with what appear to be filed off square nails. Its solid, but dosent look like new any more. Lots of character which I really like.
Half a dozen rounds down the bore at 50 yards confirmed two things. One, everything worked, and two my eyes are starting to tell my age. Sighting with thing was strictly a "best guess" proposition. The old rifle was drilled and tapped for a receiver sight from the factory. But scopes have always been my thing, and a receiver sight wasn't cheap either. I had my first Weaver when I was 12. But what to do... I couldn't bring myself to have it drilled and tapped. I Started looking at scope mounts and found the Stith type but they were rare and also expensive. Eventually I came across a post some where that mentioned a "Lightfoot mount". I contacted the poster and was eventually able to get in touch wit the person who made them. He can be contacted here <lightfootmount@gmail.com>. Great guy, makes the mount by having extensions welded to a factory "drill and tap" mount. He then sits down with his pattern action and files each one to fit. The front extension screws to a drilled and tapped dovetail that replaces the rear sight and is held in place with a set screw in addition to the dovetail fit. The rear extension is held in place with the receiver sight screws in the rear tang. He describes it as his "retirement job" and has several hundred to his credit. Tired of typing.... more n this one later. But here's a teaser...
 

Hoppy

Beginner
Aug 26, 2022
7
12
I still have a Savage 99 EG in 300 Savage, and I always wished it was a 250! In my foolish youth, I I lucked onto a transition period Model 70 Winchester in 250-3000, and it was the most accurate standard weight Model 70s I ever owned. In my early days as a teacher in Jordan Montana, I shot many deer, antelope, foxes, and coyotes with that .250 (and large numbers of prairie dogs). I used the 75 gr. Sierra hp for prairie dogs, the 87 Sierra for antelope, and the 100 gr. Sierra for deer. Although the early rifle had a 1 in 14 inch twist, it stabilized the 100 grain spitzers very well and would print one inch three shot groups at 200 yards if I did my part, so I knew they were stabilized. Eventually, a Model 70 dealer in Great Falls who desperately wanted my .250 traded me a rare Model 70 Featherweight in .358 Winchester for it. I was leaving the prairie country and moving to the elk and moose country in western Montana, so it seemed to make sense at the time. I am sure your rifle will give you many hours of enjoyable shooting and hunting. By the way, I missed the .250 so much that I bought a Remington 700 Classic in that caliber when they were introduced.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,460
2,229
Welcome aboard, Hoppy. Good to see you posting. You did well in picking up a Featherweight in 358 Win. That would be a great rifle/cartridge combination. I certainly have and have had my share of Featherweights, which are perhaps my favourite rifle. The 358 Win is one of my favourite cartridges. Yeah, as much as you loved your 250, you did well with the 358.
 

cloverleaf

Handloader
Sep 10, 2006
3,977
367
Welcome to the circus Hoppy:). Sellers regret... Many years ago I had to pass on a Ruger RSI in 250 Sav. I could have had it for $200. Cheap even then. Makes me uhappy just to say it, still. On the other hand a 358 is pretty cool too. CL
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,398
757
Welcome aboard, Hoppy. Good to see you posting. You did well in picking up a Featherweight in 358 Win. That would be a great rifle/cartridge combination. I certainly have and have had my share of Featherweights, which are perhaps my favourite rifle. The 358 Win is one of my favourite cartridges. Yeah, as much as you loved your 250, you did well with the 358.
Id give a leg for a P64 358. What a rifle.
 

Hoppy

Beginner
Aug 26, 2022
7
12
Welcome aboard, Hoppy. Good to see you posting. You did well in picking up a Featherweight in 358 Win. That would be a great rifle/cartridge combination. I certainly have and have had my share of Featherweights, which are perhaps my favourite rifle. The 358 Win is one of my favourite cartridges. Yeah, as much as you loved your 250, you did well with the 358.
The .358 Model 70s had straight comb non-monte carlo featherweight stocks with aluminum butt plates. Every one I have encountered was around the 350,000 serial number range, and they didn't make very many in 1955. Mine shot wonderfully with the 250grain Speer spitzer, and the recoil was not nearly as severe as I had expected. Alas, that model 70 was traded to acquire an exquisite Model 70 carbine (short rifle) in .22 Hornet that became my favorite "woods loafing" rifle. With Lyman 225415 bullets cast of linotype, that little hornet was excellent for fat blue grouse and just-turning-white snowshoes in the fall.
 

Hoppy

Beginner
Aug 26, 2022
7
12
Welcome to the circus Hoppy:). Sellers regret... Many years ago I had to pass on a Ruger RSI in 250 Sav. I could have had it for $200. Cheap even then. Makes me uhappy just to say it, still. On the other hand a 358 is pretty cool too. CL
ai know exactly what you mean! Seller's regret and the steal that got away are subjects we all know, but they certainly make for interesting conversation!
 
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