African hunters, a question...

Guy Miner

Master Loader
Apr 6, 2006
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So - when you're hunting plains game - how concerned are you with trophy size?

For example, is it imperative that the kudu horns measure "X" inches?

Or are you just looking for a good, mature animal?

Or does it matter at all?

Just curious, never having hunted Africa. Here in the U.S., I am pleased when I take something of pretty fair size, like a good 4x4 mule deer, the 6x6 bull elk, or the bear, but I generally am quite content to simply take a legal, animal. Laughing a bit, because this year I shot the smallest antlered buck I've ever taken!

I've got this dream about hunting gemsbok someday...

Thanks for your thoughts! Guy
 
Guy,

I have not been to Africa yet but hopefully in a couple more years.
Like you, a real trophy animal is what we all desire but I would be content with a nice reprsentation of the species.
Kudu and Water Buck are the the two that I really want the most.

JD338
 
I wanted to shoot a big Kudu when I was there and hunted quite a few days before I shot mine. It was the biggest one our group shot. One horn was over 60" and the other was high 50's (a 60" Kudu is kind of like a 30" mule deer but 50+" is generally considered good) but all of the Kudu we shot were over 51". It has one tight spiral and the other is a more open spiral. We were limited to the available animals on the ranch we hunted but they flew the ranch before we arrived and there was around 56 bulls. So we had a pretty good chance of shooting a decent bull. If your not hunting a ranch then trophy quality can be hit or miss just like hunting here. You kind of have to take your PH's advise as to what is available and what you can expect. I think my Gemsbok was 37-38" and a exceptional one is 40+. We didn't have a overly large herd to pick from though.

We bought our hunt at a SCI banquet. The company we went with was less than professional but we still had a good time. If you do go I'd research it a lot and check the SCI recommendation of the outfit.
 
Africa is a dream of mine. One that I will make come true.

From my reading and research, It seems that the key is finding a reputeable outfitter and PH.

Cape buff, kudu and gemsbok top my list. :mrgreen:
 
I'd love to go back for cape buffalo, another kudu, a waterbuck (I actually saw two really nice waterbuck but had no idea how big they were. They were BIG), and maybe a sable.
 
Unless you are paying less for a representative head as opposed to a "trophy-sized" specimen, you should set a standard and stick to it.

This is not hunting on public land where you just have a license and gas to consider.

You have to keep in mind that you will spend close to $2000 in airfare, your daily rate is hundreds of dollars per day, trophy fees for kudu and gemsbok are $1000 each and up, there are gratuities, dipping, packing, documentation, and shipping costs adding thousands more.

On top of that, your taxidermy will cost big money.

Do you still want to shoot just a "mature specimen"?

George
 
I have never hunted the game ranches of South Africa, but I have left boot tracks in Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Namibia. For me it is all about the hunt, and not always the measurement of the trophy. On a hunt where I expect to bag an average of one a day it is tough to look for all super heads. On the other hand if I have 10 days and plan on three or four animals that I already have, it is fun to concentrate on looking for only big ones.

By the way, my airfare for this year's hunt is about $3,000. The rising cost of having fun.
 
Guy,
For me it doesn't have to be in the Trophy book. Its my trophy and thats what matters. Its more about the stalking and the time it took and what it took to get him. The ranch we were on didn't have big horned Kudu, but had big Nayala. Big is nice but its more about the hunt for me.
Russ
 
Thanks all, you've provided some great input!

GeorgeS - magnificent bull! Congrats.

Guy
 
Everybody has their own standards for what they want. And no one can fault what is important to another person. George makes an excellent point about costs and wanting to get the best possible animal available for the money spent and you cant argue with that for sure.

Speaking only for myself and my family, for us it is the hunt itself. Being together, hunting together, camping together, fishing together ---

When someone mentions an animal on the wall or in a picture, it is a very quick comment, but the story that goes with the animal on the wall takes several minutes or perhaps an hour, especially if being told by more than one family member . So for me, it is the hunt, even if we come up empty, we still have the story of the hunt we did together.

I might mention that when we do come up empty it is always my husbands fault--in one way or another LOL
 
Africa Huntress":2lqaly8s said:
I might mention that when we do come up empty it is always my husbands fault--in one way or another LOL

Man, that poor guy must catch heck from you Aleena! We need to hear more from him...
 
SJB358":3h71bvlc said:
Africa Huntress":3h71bvlc said:
I might mention that when we do come up empty it is always my husbands fault--in one way or another LOL

Man, that poor guy must catch heck from you Aleena! We need to hear more from him...

Scotty, Aleena just showed this to me and to answer your question simply ----about if anything goes wrong it is my fault----I thought you were married :)- Jerry
 
Africa Huntress":2xwzsgdf said:
Scotty, Aleena just showed this to me and to answer your question simply ----about if anything goes wrong it is my fault----I thought you were married :)- Jerry

Jerry, yes, you are correct.. Trust me, I know the feelings. Seems like they are all hatched from the same eggs! :lol:
 
Could you tell me what is appropriate and allowed to kill in Africa...I'm a new hunter and want to do what is possible to do and what is not.
 
Lawrence Claudette,

You would need to communicate with the authorities in the particular jurisdiction you plan to hunt in order to obtain that information.
 
LawrenceClaudette":3qk93cua said:
Could you tell me what is appropriate and allowed to kill in Africa...I'm a new hunter and want to do what is possible to do and what is not.

There are scores of huntable species in Africa, and it will depend entirely on the country being hunted and what quotas they have established. Certain species are available in some countries but not others.

You will have to familiarize yourself with the numerous game species and their ranges. Obtain the latest copy of the Safari Club Internatiional and/or Rowland Ward record books for more information.

George
 
Dr. Mike and GeorgeS are spot on and there is nothing to be added in that regards.

I might mention many people think about the big five or dangerous seven and I would just like to give you a heads up in regards to the leopard and rhino. The black rhino is like the cape buffalo and they can be very aggressive. But the black rhino is protected and can not be hunted. you can only hunt the white rhino and they are very docile and a rather easy hunt. Since they are a very expensive hunt I just wanted you to understand the difference in the black and white rhino and which you will be allowed to hunt.

The leopard can only be hunted during the day, but they only hunt during the night. you will hunt them over bait and be in a blind and waiting and hoping they appear in the very early morning or very late in the day. this is one of the times you will be glad you spent a little more for a good scope.

The plains game hunts are fantastic and can be done on a much smaller budget. some plains game hunts are cheaper than hunting in Alaska, Russia, New Zealand, Asia and even cheaper than some hunts in Canada.

GeorgeS --I like your signature line
 
Aleena, I was curious as to what one would hunt in Canada that would cost more than a trip to Africa for plains game. I am not doubting you, just curious as I always wanted to hunt in western Canada
 
hunternyny":1z62pkey said:
Aleena, I was curious as to what one would hunt in Canada that would cost more than a trip to Africa for plains game.

I'm not Aleena, but Stone sheep hunts are expensive, as are moose in the Yukon, and polar bears in Nunavut.

George
 
George has answered your question, very well.

In general Canada is not that cheap if you hire an outfitter. A combo Dall sheep/Caribou hunt will cost you 20000. It could cost you 7500 for a Musk Ox.
I am very happy that I bugged the heck out of my husband to do a polar bear hunt several years ago, as they are now close to 30000 dollars in some areas of Canada ( maybe all areas ) and of course the world continues to pressure Canada to eliminate hunting them altogether. I read somewhere recently that they will be offering only about 60% of the permits they offered in 2012, in 2013, so when that happens the prices will go even higher. However when we recently talked to a Canadian friend of ours they said all the permits to hunt them were sold out in 2012. So a lo of people still want to add the white bear to their list of animals they have hunted it appears.

Even Alaska has gotten expensive. The last time my husband and I got the itch to hunt moose and brown bear we went to Russia, it was cheaper than Alaska or Canada.
 
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