Browning BLR

gbflyer

Member
Mar 28, 2017
860
6
So my 14 year old son is having difficulty with his bolt action. It’s not a mechanical issue, he just doesn’t get it yet. We will continue to practice, however he is rather rigid and prefers the lever. I was thinking about a BLR in 7-08, I see they make a 20” barreled stainless. Expensive. I remember there are a few folks here who have them. What are the pros/cons? We hunt in wet and sometimes freezing conditions in the late Fall. Are the magazine’s reliable and reasonable to manipulate?

Thanks in advance.
 

gbflyer

Member
Mar 28, 2017
860
6
seokladuckin":b511cymp said:
They are good.

How about AR15 in 6.5 Grendel?

He'd like that

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He like the AR we have. It’s more of an M4 pattern I guess. In 5.56 which is adequate for our deer here. My concern is that he will do what I did. I had a BAR when I was a kid and just threw lead at everything. Took awhile to figure out area suppression fire was not a good strategy for hunting[emoji23]
 
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HodgemanAK

Member
Oct 23, 2020
171
16
Couple of ideas... is he just forgetting to work the bolt? If so, a bolt action .22 and some plinking is in order. My son used to forget to work the bolt...the culprit was his 10/22 and all of the video games he played didn't require an action to reload. His bolt action CF was the only gun he shot with a manual reload.

When he swapped to bolt action .22s for rifle team...plain muscle memory solved the problem.

The other kid I coached was trying to shoot with his non-dominant eye. For some reason, that short circuited his wiring to work the bolt with his right hand. I let him have a go with a LH bolt action and the problem went away.

Nothing wrong with BLRs, they are spendy but typically reliable. I'd just make sure it addressed the problem in total.
 

Blkram

Active member
Nov 25, 2013
1,736
4
Nothing wrong with him preferring a lever action. We all have our preferences, and it is good to recognize and support this.
And one in the 7mm-08 would be a good fit, and serve him well with all manner of big game hunting.
They are reliable firearms and the magazines work well.
Only downside for most, is the trigger. But with practice, he will learn when it breaks and will be able to produce hunting accuracy with it. (Mine will produce 1" groups when I do my part.)
Teach him how to keep his rifle well cared for and lubricated to protect it from the elements and rust, and it should produce decades of good service.
Hope he enjoys it!
 

gbflyer

Member
Mar 28, 2017
860
6
HodgemanAK":38ejxnyj said:
Couple of ideas... is he just forgetting to work the bolt? If so, a bolt action .22 and some plinking is in order. My son used to forget to work the bolt...the culprit was his 10/22 and all of the video games he played didn't require an action to reload. His bolt action CF was the only gun he shot with a manual reload.

When he swapped to bolt action .22s for rifle team...plain muscle memory solved the problem.

The other kid I coached was trying to shoot with his non-dominant eye. For some reason, that short circuited his wiring to work the bolt with his right hand. I let him have a go with a LH bolt action and the problem went away.

Nothing wrong with BLRs, they are spendy but typically reliable. I'd just make sure it addressed the problem in total.
You got it. I don’t have a bolt .22. We have a couple of break open single shots and semi autos. He just hasn’t used a bolt much. You’re right, more practice.
 

Dr. Vette

Active member
Apr 16, 2012
1,289
1
gbflyer":yb9gf1yb said:
You got it. I don’t have a bolt .22. We have a couple of break open single shots and semi autos. He just hasn’t used a bolt much. You’re right, more practice.

Even my Dad, at 78, brings his bolt action 22 to the range, practicing with that all morning while I do load workup on the centerfires. Trigger time never hurts.
 

bdbrown66

Member
May 16, 2016
645
1
If you're considering the BLR, the Henry Long Ranger may be a more affordable alternative. I don't think they make it in 7-08, tho. I know it's made in 308 and 6.5 CM, tho.
 

ShadeTree

Active member
Mar 6, 2017
2,187
13
I know nothing about the Henry rifle, but if they are smooth operating and reliable, Bd makes a valid point as they should be somewhat cheaper. You'd have to double check the weight, LOP, etc, for a youngster compared to a BLR.

If you could swing it the BLR in a 7-08 would be a dandy rifle I'd think that would provide reasonable recoil in that platform. And in a BLR would make for a valuable keepsake.

The 7mm-08 doesn't always get the recognition it deserves IMO, I think it's a really nice cartridge that can hit way above it's weight class.
 

SJB358

Well-known member
Dec 24, 2006
30,975
28
I'd absolutely love a BLR 7-08 or even a Remington 760 or 7600 if you can find one of them.

But some solid 22 or small centerfire practice would be great as well, heck for all of us it wouldn't hurt!
 

gbflyer

Member
Mar 28, 2017
860
6
To follow up, we capped off our hunting (read: harvest) season right after Christmas with my older son being home from Wyoming. I gave the younger one the AR with the red dot he is used to. Went 3 for 3. In the mean time I am putting together a chassis-based bolt gun that uses aics magazines and we can put a AR carbine stock on it. Hopefully that will turn the corner from semi to bolt. If not, that’s ok too.
 

MZ5

Member
Aug 28, 2017
32
0
I have a BLR. It's a 'newer' one with the aluminum receiver. Newer is in demi-quotes because it's still 20 years old (or more?), but some people seem to believe all BLRs are the old steel receiver guns.

I love the BLR from a handling point of view, and I really like lever actions. Mine is a 243, and it shoots very well but a group will open significantly on shots 5 through 8 if fired rapid fire, in my rifle.

Limitations of the BLR?

1) Magazines are a bit expensive if you like to have a spare or spares. Not horrible, but they're a bit pricey.

2) Gas containment isn't the best. When I lost a primer one day on mine, I felt hot particles hit my face. No physical damage to me (I ALWAYS wear eye protection) or the gun, but it made clear that gas and particles can come straight back at you, I believe through the center of the bolt (around the firing pin and straight back all the way through). Maybe it came back through the grooves of the bolt raceway, too(?). Don't know whether things would have been the same or worse had the entire case head let go.

To be fair, my reference standard for gas containment and shooter protection is the Ruger No.1. I _have_ had total case failure in a No.1, and the only way I knew something was wrong was unusual recoil, the shot hit WAY off, and the primer and case pieces came out separate from one another.
(-:

If he likes the BLR, let him shoot one. They're good rifles!
 
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