Powder for 150gr Accubond LR 270

bclark7b

Beginner
Apr 15, 2022
13
5
Hello Everyone.

I'm very new to reloading. So new I actually haven't loaded a single round yet so this may be a dumb question. I finally got my hands on some primers and bought 150gr ABLR for 270 win. I have 2 powders IMR 4831 and Ramshot hunter. I have 2 loading manuals but can't find the 150 gr ABLR with either of these powders. Does this mean I can't use these, or is there a different reference I could use to find out how many grains to use?

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,244
1,824
Welcome aboard, and nothing dumb about your question. It is a challenge that each of us has faced early in our efforts to feed our habit.

Chances are that the loading manuals you bought don't list that particular bullet simply because they focused on their own product or the powders do not provide optimal performance. Perhaps other powders provide higher velocities or better case fills or more complete combustion. This does not mean that the powders you have will not work or that they are unsafe. You will find data for the Nosler ABLR at this url: https://www.nosler.com/270-winchester.

QuickLoad allows us to make a few projections that may address the specific question concerning that particular bullet with the powders you have available.

Code:
Cartridge          : .270 Win. (SAAMI)
Bullet             : .277, 150, Nosler Accubond LR 58836 G7
Useable Case Capaci: 58.520 grain H2O = 3.800 cm³
Cartridge O.A.L. L6: 3.340 inch = 84.84 mm
Barrel Length      : 22.0 inch = 558.8 mm
Powder             : Ramshot Hunter

Predicted data by increasing and decreasing the given charge,
incremented in steps of 1.0% of nominal charge.
CAUTION: Figures exceed maximum and minimum recommended loads !

Step    Fill. Charge   Vel.  Energy   Pmax   Pmuz  Prop.Burnt B_Time
 %       %    Grains   fps   ft.lbs    psi    psi      %        ms

-10.0   89    49.50   2627    2299   46141  11559     97.9    1.266
-09.0   90    50.05   2656    2349   47656  11676     98.2    1.247
-08.0   91    50.60   2684    2400   49218  11787     98.5    1.228
-07.0   92    51.15   2713    2451   50830  11894     98.8    1.210
-06.0   93    51.70   2741    2502   52495  11996     99.0    1.191
-05.0   94    52.25   2769    2554   54212  12094     99.2    1.174
-04.0   95    52.80   2797    2606   55986  12186     99.4    1.157  ! Near Maximum !
-03.0   96    53.35   2825    2659   57818  12273     99.6    1.140  ! Near Maximum !
-02.0   97    53.90   2853    2711   59709  12355     99.7    1.123  ! Near Maximum !
-01.0   98    54.45   2881    2765   61663  12431     99.8    1.107  ! Near Maximum !
+00.0   99    55.00   2909    2818   63682  12502     99.9    1.091  ! Near Maximum !
+01.0  100    55.55   2937    2872   65768  12567    100.0    1.075  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+02.0  101    56.10   2964    2926   67924  12626    100.0    1.059  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+03.0  102    56.65   2992    2981   70153  12680    100.0    1.044  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+04.0  103    57.20   3019    3035   72458  12731    100.0    1.029  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+05.0  104    57.75   3046    3090   74841  12782    100.0    1.015  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!

Results caused by ± 10% powder lot-to-lot burning rate variation using nominal charge
Data for burning rate increased by 10% relative to nominal value:
+Ba     99    55.00   3021    3040   75946  12046    100.0    1.013  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
Data for burning rate decreased by 10% relative to nominal value:
-Ba     99    55.00   2745    2509   51614  12506     96.4    1.193

Code:
Cartridge          : .270 Win. (SAAMI)
Bullet             : .277, 150, Nosler Accubond LR 58836 G7
Useable Case Capaci: 58.520 grain H2O = 3.800 cm³
Cartridge O.A.L. L6: 3.340 inch = 84.84 mm
Barrel Length      : 22.0 inch = 558.8 mm
Powder             : IMR 4831

Predicted data by increasing and decreasing the given charge,
incremented in steps of 1.0% of nominal charge.
CAUTION: Figures exceed maximum and minimum recommended loads !

Step    Fill. Charge   Vel.  Energy   Pmax   Pmuz  Prop.Burnt B_Time
 %       %    Grains   fps   ft.lbs    psi    psi      %        ms

-10.0   93    48.06   2610    2268   46634  11046     99.3    1.278
-09.0   94    48.59   2637    2316   48154  11135     99.5    1.259
-08.0   95    49.13   2664    2364   49721  11219     99.6    1.240
-07.0   96    49.66   2691    2412   51338  11299     99.8    1.221
-06.0   97    50.20   2718    2461   53007  11373     99.9    1.203
-05.0   98    50.73   2745    2510   54728  11442     99.9    1.185
-04.0   99    51.26   2772    2559   56504  11505    100.0    1.168  ! Near Maximum !
-03.0  100    51.80   2798    2608   58337  11563    100.0    1.151  ! Near Maximum !
-02.0  101    52.33   2825    2658   60229  11618    100.0    1.134  ! Near Maximum !
-01.0  102    52.87   2851    2708   62182  11672    100.0    1.118  ! Near Maximum !
+00.0  103    53.40   2878    2758   64198  11724    100.0    1.101  ! Near Maximum !
+01.0  104    53.93   2904    2808   66282  11776    100.0    1.086  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+02.0  105    54.47   2930    2859   68433  11827    100.0    1.070  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+03.0  106    55.00   2956    2909   70656  11877    100.0    1.055  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+04.0  107    55.54   2981    2960   72953  11926    100.0    1.040  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+05.0  109    56.07   3007    3012   75328  11975    100.0    1.025  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!

Results caused by ± 10% powder lot-to-lot burning rate variation using nominal charge
Data for burning rate increased by 10% relative to nominal value:
+Ba    103    53.40   2977    2951   76492  11297    100.0    1.023  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
Data for burning rate decreased by 10% relative to nominal value:
-Ba    103    53.40   2727    2477   52012  12036     98.3    1.207

If you use this projection, remember to drop back about four or five grains as you begin to work up your load. If you have further questions, don't hesitate to ask. Someone will be very glad to provide whatever assistance they can.

Again, welcome aboard.
 

possum

Beginner
Jan 17, 2016
59
27
Here's some data from www.hodgdonreloading.com

You can use the data for the .277 DIA , 150gr ABLR with Ramshot Hunter powder. Just start low and work your way up.

There are other members here that have Quick Load will be able to help you with the IMR 4831.





BULLET WEIGHT
150 GR. NOS PART
CASE
WINCHESTER
PRIMER
WINCHESTER LR, LARGE RIFLE


ManufacturerPowderBullet Diam.C.O.LGrs.Vel. (ft/s)PressureGrs.Vel. (ft/s)Pressure
Starting LoadMaximum Loads
RamshotHunterOUT OF STOCK0.277"3.320"46.42,62257,900 PSI51.52,86964,300 PSI


I see DrMike beat me outta the gate..........
 

bclark7b

Beginner
Apr 15, 2022
13
5
Welcome aboard, and nothing dumb about your question. It is a challenge that each of us has faced early in our efforts to feed our habit.

Chances are that the loading manuals you bought don't list that particular bullet simply because they focused on their own product or the powders do not provide optimal performance. Perhaps other powders provide higher velocities or better case fills or more complete combustion. This does not mean that the powders you have will not work or that they are unsafe. You will find data for the Nosler ABLR at this url: https://www.nosler.com/270-winchester.

QuickLoad allows us to make a few projections that may address the specific question concerning that particular bullet with the powders you have available.

Code:
Cartridge          : .270 Win. (SAAMI)
Bullet             : .277, 150, Nosler Accubond LR 58836 G7
Useable Case Capaci: 58.520 grain H2O = 3.800 cm³
Cartridge O.A.L. L6: 3.340 inch = 84.84 mm
Barrel Length      : 22.0 inch = 558.8 mm
Powder             : Ramshot Hunter

Predicted data by increasing and decreasing the given charge,
incremented in steps of 1.0% of nominal charge.
CAUTION: Figures exceed maximum and minimum recommended loads !

Step    Fill. Charge   Vel.  Energy   Pmax   Pmuz  Prop.Burnt B_Time
 %       %    Grains   fps   ft.lbs    psi    psi      %        ms

-10.0   89    49.50   2627    2299   46141  11559     97.9    1.266
-09.0   90    50.05   2656    2349   47656  11676     98.2    1.247
-08.0   91    50.60   2684    2400   49218  11787     98.5    1.228
-07.0   92    51.15   2713    2451   50830  11894     98.8    1.210
-06.0   93    51.70   2741    2502   52495  11996     99.0    1.191
-05.0   94    52.25   2769    2554   54212  12094     99.2    1.174
-04.0   95    52.80   2797    2606   55986  12186     99.4    1.157  ! Near Maximum !
-03.0   96    53.35   2825    2659   57818  12273     99.6    1.140  ! Near Maximum !
-02.0   97    53.90   2853    2711   59709  12355     99.7    1.123  ! Near Maximum !
-01.0   98    54.45   2881    2765   61663  12431     99.8    1.107  ! Near Maximum !
+00.0   99    55.00   2909    2818   63682  12502     99.9    1.091  ! Near Maximum !
+01.0  100    55.55   2937    2872   65768  12567    100.0    1.075  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+02.0  101    56.10   2964    2926   67924  12626    100.0    1.059  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+03.0  102    56.65   2992    2981   70153  12680    100.0    1.044  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+04.0  103    57.20   3019    3035   72458  12731    100.0    1.029  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+05.0  104    57.75   3046    3090   74841  12782    100.0    1.015  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!

Results caused by ± 10% powder lot-to-lot burning rate variation using nominal charge
Data for burning rate increased by 10% relative to nominal value:
+Ba     99    55.00   3021    3040   75946  12046    100.0    1.013  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
Data for burning rate decreased by 10% relative to nominal value:
-Ba     99    55.00   2745    2509   51614  12506     96.4    1.193

Code:
Cartridge          : .270 Win. (SAAMI)
Bullet             : .277, 150, Nosler Accubond LR 58836 G7
Useable Case Capaci: 58.520 grain H2O = 3.800 cm³
Cartridge O.A.L. L6: 3.340 inch = 84.84 mm
Barrel Length      : 22.0 inch = 558.8 mm
Powder             : IMR 4831

Predicted data by increasing and decreasing the given charge,
incremented in steps of 1.0% of nominal charge.
CAUTION: Figures exceed maximum and minimum recommended loads !

Step    Fill. Charge   Vel.  Energy   Pmax   Pmuz  Prop.Burnt B_Time
 %       %    Grains   fps   ft.lbs    psi    psi      %        ms

-10.0   93    48.06   2610    2268   46634  11046     99.3    1.278
-09.0   94    48.59   2637    2316   48154  11135     99.5    1.259
-08.0   95    49.13   2664    2364   49721  11219     99.6    1.240
-07.0   96    49.66   2691    2412   51338  11299     99.8    1.221
-06.0   97    50.20   2718    2461   53007  11373     99.9    1.203
-05.0   98    50.73   2745    2510   54728  11442     99.9    1.185
-04.0   99    51.26   2772    2559   56504  11505    100.0    1.168  ! Near Maximum !
-03.0  100    51.80   2798    2608   58337  11563    100.0    1.151  ! Near Maximum !
-02.0  101    52.33   2825    2658   60229  11618    100.0    1.134  ! Near Maximum !
-01.0  102    52.87   2851    2708   62182  11672    100.0    1.118  ! Near Maximum !
+00.0  103    53.40   2878    2758   64198  11724    100.0    1.101  ! Near Maximum !
+01.0  104    53.93   2904    2808   66282  11776    100.0    1.086  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+02.0  105    54.47   2930    2859   68433  11827    100.0    1.070  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+03.0  106    55.00   2956    2909   70656  11877    100.0    1.055  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+04.0  107    55.54   2981    2960   72953  11926    100.0    1.040  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+05.0  109    56.07   3007    3012   75328  11975    100.0    1.025  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!

Results caused by ± 10% powder lot-to-lot burning rate variation using nominal charge
Data for burning rate increased by 10% relative to nominal value:
+Ba    103    53.40   2977    2951   76492  11297    100.0    1.023  !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
Data for burning rate decreased by 10% relative to nominal value:
-Ba    103    53.40   2727    2477   52012  12036     98.3    1.207

If you use this projection, remember to drop back about four or five grains as you begin to work up your load. If you have further questions, don't hesitate to ask. Someone will be very glad to provide whatever assistance they can.

Again, welcome aboard.
Thank you very much for this information! So if i were looking for say 2850 fps I would use 4-5 grains less than the 52.87 grains of the IMR 4831 it will take to reach that velocity.
If that is correct what is a good process for working up the grains? Do you make a handful of rounds and check performance at certain distances or is a chronograph a necessary piece of equipment in all this? Then finally what are signs to look for to know a load is getting to hot or that you don't have enough powder?
Thanks again for your answer above and the time it took you to give it I really appreciate it DrMike!

Ben
 

TackDriver284

Handloader
Feb 13, 2016
1,821
506
Hello Ben, welcome to the forum. Your questions aren't dumb just because you are new, we all were newbies at one point, but we learn from research, experience, asking questions and this forum is the place. First of all , I would recommend to read the basics of reloading to get started to get an idea how load development works.
As to your questions, I would start low or 10% of the maximum load it shows in the books, example, if min is 43 grains and max is 47 grains, I would load one charge per bullet, as 43, 43.5, 44, 44.5, 45, 45.5, 46, 46.5 and 47, this is called a ladder and run it on a chronograph to see the velocities. Most important of all, if you seek maximum velocity, then you should learn to read pressure. Flattened primers, heavy bolt lift, swiped case heads, defined ejector marks on the case heads, excessive speed are signs of pressure. As you are a new reloader, I would advise you stay within the min and max charges in the manuals until you understand how pressure works. I'm adding a You Tube video on How to see Pressure, its a nice read to get an idea. This guy in the video gives nice info and he has many other topics.

You will need some measuring tools like the Hornady Lock N Load OAL gauge to measure OAL length for your chamber of your rifle to get the exact OAL length for your cartridges to adjust your seating die seating length ( not at the lands, but back off .020" at least or a little more / check book lengths as well ) and the inserts to measure headspace. It's a valuable tool.

Any other questions, just ask us. There are many knowledgeable guys on here.
 
Last edited:

Alex36

Beginner
Mar 29, 2022
19
35
Welcome, there’s quite the learning curve with this stuff. Read a lot! Write everything down (I learned that the hard way ) when you work on a specific caliber or load for a gun. One of the biggest mistakes I made early on was going to the range or the mountain with 5 different loads for 3 rifles … You’ll never truly get a load where you want it until you focus on just it and it alone. Now a days I pick a powder and a bullet and I work charge/speed to a where I want it ( watching for pressure signs then backing off .5 gr or more sometimes. ) and then fine tune the seating depth. I use s as magneto speed sporter now for a graph. Much easier IMO. I’ve got and old chrony alpha I believe. It still works just fine. Good luck to you and be careful. It’s all in the details
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,244
1,824
Mark has given you solid advice. I seldom perform a ladder test, not because the test has no value, but primarily when I was loading commercially I didn't have the luxury of time to review. Consequently, I would load four cartridges at charge intervals to give me an idea of what was going on. With standard cartridges such as the 270 Win, the charges would be spaced at perhaps one grain intervals. As I gained familiarity with cartridges and the powders used, I was able to refine that considerably. However, the recommendation to stay within minimum and maximum charges is solid.

As stated, pressure signs include, though not limited, to ejector marks, flattened primers, stiff bolt lift, and velocities in excess of what you are anticipating. There is a correlation between pressure and velocity, though it is not a strict correlation. In general, increased pressure generates increased velocity. The exceptions to this observation are not germane at this moment in your reloading experience.
 

bclark7b

Beginner
Apr 15, 2022
13
5
Hello Ben, welcome to the forum. Your questions aren't dumb just because you are new, we all were newbies at one point, but we learn from research, experience, asking questions and this forum is the place. First of all , I would recommend to read the basics of reloading to get started to get an idea how load development works.
As to your questions, I would start low or 10% of the maximum load it shows in the books, example, if min is 43 grains and max is 47 grains, I would load one charge per bullet, as 43, 43.5, 44, 44.5, 45, 45.5, 46, 46.5 and 47, this is called a ladder and run it on a chronograph to see the velocities. Most important of all, if you seek maximum velocity, then you should learn to read pressure. Flattened primers, heavy bolt lift, swiped case heads, defined ejector marks on the case heads, excessive speed are signs of pressure. As you are a new reloader, I would advise you stay within the min and max charges in the manuals until you understand how pressure works. I'm adding a You Tube video on How to see Pressure, its a nice read to get an idea. This guy in the video gives nice info and he has many other topics.

You will need some measuring tools like the Hornady Lock N Load OAL gauge to measure OAL length for your chamber of your rifle to get the exact OAL length for your cartridges to adjust your seating die seating length ( not at the lands, but back off .020" at least or a little more / check book lengths as well ) and the inserts to measure headspace. It's a valuable tool.

Any other questions, just ask us. There are many knowledgeable guys on here.
Thank you very much! Really good stuff. I'll definitely take a look at that video later. I'm definitely on the conservative side with all this so even compressed loads have me nervous at this point! I'll definitely be staying within the recomended powder levels. Thanks again!
 

bclark7b

Beginner
Apr 15, 2022
13
5
Welcome, there’s quite the learning curve with this stuff. Read a lot! Write everything down (I learned that the hard way ) when you work on a specific caliber or load for a gun. One of the biggest mistakes I made early on was going to the range or the mountain with 5 different loads for 3 rifles … You’ll never truly get a load where you want it until you focus on just it and it alone. Now a days I pick a powder and a bullet and I work charge/speed to a where I want it ( watching for pressure signs then backing off .5 gr or more sometimes. ) and then fine tune the seating depth. I use s as magneto speed sporter now for a graph. Much easier IMO. I’ve got and old chrony alpha I believe. It still works just fine. Good luck to you and be careful. It’s all in the details
Thanks so much for the info! What books you would recommend? I've had my eye on that magneto speed sporter, but wasn't sure what i needed so spending that money without knowing if it was what i needed seemed silly. Thanks again for your time!
 

Alex36

Beginner
Mar 29, 2022
19
35
I wasn’t meaning a specific book, just I remember being in your spot and I believe the one thing that got me to where I am now was patiently reading everything I could about the products I was using. The little 3 pager instructions in your dies, the reloading manual you have ect… you’ve got you tube now but what I use to do was read old threads on forums like this one for hours… it helps just remember when it comes to specific loads for a certain caliber you can’t copy a load. There’s a lot that goes into pressure .. tons of variables how the chamber is cut, length of barrel, different lots of powder and primers. Brass can be a big difference also. I’m just giving a few of many examples why you need to do your own work ups and start low on your manual. Just an example /. Say I post my load for 7mag and it’s 70.3 grs of X powder and a 160 grn AccuBond. Wlrm primer oal 3.385”
and someone comes along and sees this and they’re like hey I hand that bullet powder and a 7mag and they load that same round up but it won’t chamber. So they seat the bullet back to book value 3.290” for 7mag. That right there is going to make a medium/high pressure load in my rifle be dangerous for yours. Seating depth and chamber dimensions are very critical to building high speed rifle cartridges. The difference a lot is the manufacturer of rifle Tikka s are notorious for long throated chambers they can handle the above pressure and length. My savage 110 couldn’t handle any of my loads I had got my tikka in the same chambering. Custom rifles are the same way some are short throated and some long. My point is myself and what the rest of these guys here are trying to help you with is there’s no end to knowledge you can always learn more especially in reloading rifle building. And don’t want to see anyone hurt or ruin there equipment. Like tack driver said there can be no dumb question when it comes to this. If that were the case I probably had about 10,000 of them 😂. Feel free to ask anything from me anytime. As I’m sure the rest of these guys are thinking also. I’m new to this forum (forums in general) but hand been reloading since I was in high school. I do want to say these other guys on here that have been helping you on this thread are some of the long time members and know about and have alot more resources than myself. Quick load bring one! If it’s a question about reloading tho I will gladly help! Good luck.
 

Alex36

Beginner
Mar 29, 2022
19
35
I apologize for some of the spelling! My auto correct doesn’t like me very much this morning!
 

PJGunner

Handloader
Dec 11, 2010
1,815
360
"I apologize for some of the spelling! My auto correct doesn’t like me very much this morning!"

You can just turn it off. Then it just flags words it doesn't like, like changing spitzer to to spritzer. Then you can decide in the word need correcting.
Paul B.
 

hunter24605

Handloader
Apr 30, 2016
1,429
1,063
Welcome, hang around here and you'll have all your questions answered by very knowledgeable folks, and they won't attack or shame you (which seems to be the norm on other sights) Good luck with the ABLR, I had a devil of a time getting them to fly accurately. Ive found they do like a loooong jump to the lands, like .150" plus. Personally I use the 10 shot flat spot method, and it seems to at least get me real close to the most accurate load with any given powder. But not always. But given the scarcity of components right now, it's an efficient method to use without burning through a bunch of powder/primers. Good luck in your endeavors. And we're looking forward to seeing your results.
10 shot "flat spot Method"
 
Last edited:

Alex36

Beginner
Mar 29, 2022
19
35
"I apologize for some of the spelling! My auto correct doesn’t like me very much this morning!"

You can just turn it off. Then it just flags words it doesn't like, like changing spitzer to to spritzer. Then you can decide in the word need correcting.
Paul B.
Sweet! Thank you Paul
 

jimbires

Handloader
Aug 16, 2011
2,496
459
it was mentioned above , these ABLR bullets can be tough to get to work well . if things don't go well , consider a different bullet before you burn up all your powder and bullets . usually ballistic tips are easy to tune .
 

bclark7b

Beginner
Apr 15, 2022
13
5
it was mentioned above , these ABLR bullets can be tough to get to work well . if things don't go well , consider a different bullet before you burn up all your powder and bullets . usually ballistic tips are easy to tune .

Thanks for the reply! Well that's a bummer! I bought them because it's the bullet used in the only factory ammo I could find enough boxes of to take with my on a hunting trip to WY last fall. I liked how they preformed on a mule deer at 312 yards. Any specific bullet i should consider? I usually am shooting whitetail, but will be making the occasional mule deer trip. Also my max range I want to shoot at this point is 400 yards.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,244
1,824
The ballistic tip will work very well for deer and other thin-skinned game. This bullet is recognised as a very accurate pill. The AccuBond is another bullet and performs well without being too fussy. It does like a longer jump than some other bullets. Any cup-and-core bullet will work well for you. I use the E-Tip in my Nosler 270 WSM. It has performed well for me in a variety of cartridges. With this bullet in the 270 WSM, I have taken whitetail, mule deer, black bear, moose, and elk. I find it to be a "do all" bullet.
 

TackDriver284

Handloader
Feb 13, 2016
1,821
506
Thanks for the reply! Well that's a bummer! I bought them because it's the bullet used in the only factory ammo I could find enough boxes of to take with my on a hunting trip to WY last fall. I liked how they preformed on a mule deer at 312 yards. Any specific bullet i should consider? I usually am shooting whitetail, but will be making the occasional mule deer trip. Also my max range I want to shoot at this point is 400 yards.
I'm sure a Ballistic Tip will work as far as 400 yards or beyond, its so accurate and wicked. I'm sure you will be happy with those bullets. It's my go to bullet for hunting if they are available, if not I'll use the AccuBond / Hornady ELD-X. If the ABLR works accurately for you, then go for it. I remembered it being fussy in my 7 Mag a while back, then I switched to a Ballistic Tip and problem was solved, its easy to tune as Jim mentioned. AccuBond works very well that it traveled the length of a red stag from stem to stern with my 300 Win Mag at a tad under 300 yards earlier this past January, I made a recent post about it, you won't go wrong with it.
 

jimbires

Handloader
Aug 16, 2011
2,496
459
Thanks for the reply! Well that's a bummer! I bought them because it's the bullet used in the only factory ammo I could find enough boxes of to take with my on a hunting trip to WY last fall. I liked how they preformed on a mule deer at 312 yards. Any specific bullet i should consider? I usually am shooting whitetail, but will be making the occasional mule deer trip. Also my max range I want to shoot at this point is 400 yards.

I don't want you getting discouraged trying to get a very finicky ABLR to group well . there are much easier bullets out there to work with .
the big problem today is trying to find components . a lot of the old school stuff is not in as high of demand as the newer stuff , this might make them easier to find . about any of the regular cup and core bullet should do what you need .

I'd say a 130 grain , or 150 grain ballistic tip would be a good choice for you in the 270 win . I don't think mule deer are harder to kill than whitetails , out to 300 or 400 yards should be no problem for the ballistic tip bullet . Hornady bullets in the 130 or 150 grain , like the SP , or the BTSP would work well for you too .these are also easy to tune . the Hornady SST , and innerbond can be tough to get in tune . the Nosler Partition is another bullet that's usually easy to tune . for what you're hunting I don't think you need a Partition , but it would work well .

I do a lot of my whitetail hunting with a 7mm-08 . I use Hornady 139 gr BTSP bullets , these bullets work well for me .they are accurate , and on game performance has been good enough that I'm not looking to change . I've taken whitetails at 400 yards using them .
 
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