quick load request for 270 please

ReloadKy

Beginner
May 13, 2020
231
26
I hate to ask but my curiosity is forcing me to experiment. Can I please get a quick load work up for
270 in a Remington Model 700 22 inch barrel
Powder IMR 4451
Bullet 130 gr Barnes TTSX
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
34,695
763
Cartridge : .270 Win. (SAAMI)
Bullet : .277, 130, Barnes 'TTSX'BT 30276
Useable Case Capaci: 59.268 grain H2O = 3.848 cm³
Cartridge O.A.L. L6: 3.340 inch = 84.84 mm
Barrel Length : 22.0 inch = 558.8 mm
Powder : IMR 4451 Enduron *C*T

Predicted data by increasing and decreasing the given charge,
incremented in steps of 1.0% of nominal charge.
CAUTION: Figures exceed maximum and minimum recommended loads !

Step Fill. Charge Vel. Energy Pmax Pmuz Prop.Burnt B_Time
% % Grains fps ft.lbs psi psi % ms

-10.0 88 47.34 2747 2179 47558 10746 95.7 1.171
-09.0 89 47.87 2776 2224 49005 10868 96.0 1.155
-08.0 90 48.39 2804 2270 50493 10988 96.4 1.139
-07.0 91 48.92 2833 2316 52025 11104 96.8 1.123
-06.0 92 49.44 2861 2363 53602 11218 97.1 1.107
-05.0 93 49.97 2889 2410 55225 11328 97.4 1.092
-04.0 94 50.50 2918 2457 56896 11435 97.7 1.077 ! Near Maximum !
-03.0 95 51.02 2946 2505 58617 11539 98.0 1.062 ! Near Maximum !
-02.0 95 51.55 2974 2553 60389 11640 98.3 1.048 ! Near Maximum !
-01.0 96 52.07 3002 2601 62215 11737 98.5 1.034 ! Near Maximum !
+00.0 97 52.60 3030 2650 64095 11830 98.7 1.020 ! Near Maximum !
+01.0 98 53.13 3058 2699 66032 11920 99.0 1.006 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+02.0 99 53.65 3086 2749 68029 12006 99.1 0.993 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+03.0 100 54.18 3114 2799 70086 12088 99.3 0.979 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+04.0 101 54.70 3142 2849 72208 12166 99.5 0.966 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
+05.0 102 55.23 3169 2900 74395 12240 99.6 0.954 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!

Results caused by ± 10% powder lot-to-lot burning rate variation using nominal charge
Data for burning rate increased by 10% relative to nominal value:
+Ba 97 52.60 3146 2858 74142 11613 100.0 0.956 !DANGEROUS LOAD-DO NOT USE!
Data for burning rate decreased by 10% relative to nominal value:
-Ba 97 52.60 2873 2382 54131 11556 94.0 1.102
 

ReloadKy

Beginner
May 13, 2020
231
26
So I apparently went a little hot when i was working up this load. I had already tried this combo out and got some great accuracy (post regarding 270 good enough for elk). I used 54.1 gr of IMR 54.1 which quick load says is a bit hot. I did not get any pressure signs at all. Was considering going up in powder charge as hodgon reloading data says I could go to 55.5 gr. I am not an velocity nut but want to maximize terminal energy and the slower you start the lower it is.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
34,695
763
Bear in mind that each firing system is unique. QL provides a guide based on mathematics. It is usually quite close in the projections provided to the actual firing system. Small changes in chamber dimensions, barrel dimensions, powder lots, etc. are somewhat amplified in either direction. This is the reason that you need to read the pressure signs as you work your load. If there are no signs of excessive pressure, I'd be inclined to increase in small increments until I saw that limit if I was pursuing velocity. My personal practise is to work for accuracy in my hunting loads. Velocity differentials seldom make a major difference in loads that will launch a projectile under 400 yards or so. As the saying goes, YMMV.

I will note that the data Hodgdon provides is pressure tested, which should give a measure of comfort. They don't publish a load that they feel is unsafe. Many people have questioned why the various manufacturers that publish load data aren't in more absolute agreement. I've always taken the view that the loads (QL or published data) are recommendations and not to be taken as absolute, since I must verify in my own firing system that the load is safe. That is on me. Hope that helps.
 

jimbires

Handloader
Aug 16, 2011
2,390
207
what DrMike explains for quickload , also holds true for the books . the book info is probably pressure tested by the powder manufacture , or the bullet manufacture . the problem is they pressure tested using their lot of powder , their primer , their brass case , using their test rifle , or pressure barrel . so now we are right back to the same place . this brings up a very important rule ; start low and work up , while watching for signs of pressure .
 

George Foster

Beginner
Dec 4, 2005
157
12
I have asked for and received quite a few Quickload reports. As him I always try for the best accuracy with a powder and bullet in my rifles. Doing so I am almost always below where Quickoad says you shouldn't exceed. I would much rather give up a little velocity for a gain in accuracy.
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,224
377
Bear in mind that each firing system is unique. QL provides a guide based on mathematics. It is usually quite close in the projections provided to the actual firing system. Small changes in chamber dimensions, barrel dimensions, powder lots, etc. are somewhat amplified in either direction. This is the reason that you need to read the pressure signs as you work your load. If there are no signs of excessive pressure, I'd be inclined to increase in small increments until I saw that limit if I was pursuing velocity. My personal practise is to work for accuracy in my hunting loads. Velocity differentials seldom make a major difference in loads that will launch a projectile under 400 yards or so. As the saying goes, YMMV.

I will note that the data Hodgdon provides is pressure tested, which should give a measure of comfort. They don't publish a load that they feel is unsafe. Many people have questioned why the various manufacturers that publish load data aren't in more absolute agreement. I've always taken the view that the loads (QL or published data) are recommendations and not to be taken as absolute, since I must verify in my own firing system that the load is safe. That is on me. Hope that helps.

The chronograph is really your best friend here. Call me crazy, but I use speeds that produced and work towards those within reason. There are so many different combinations that relying on a listed to charge to produce a certain speed has seldom worked for me. An inexpensive chronograph is really a great tool since most of us do not have pressure equipment we can only rely on speeds produced by our combinations. Brass capacity and different lots of powder are enough different that I see those as most of the variables I observe in my own reloading.
 

michsteve

Beginner
Aug 20, 2020
90
57
what DrMike explains for quickload , also holds true for the books . the book info is probably pressure tested by the powder manufacture , or the bullet manufacture . the problem is they pressure tested using their lot of powder , their primer , their brass case , using their test rifle , or pressure barrel . so now we are right back to the same place . this brings up a very important rule ; start low and work up , while watching for signs of pressure .
I loaded some 6.5 Creedmoor last December for my new Henry Long Ranger. I used 130 grain AccuBond and went .5 grains less than max for a load by Nosler. Now the difference was I used Starline brass instead of the Hornady in the recipe. I lowered my seating die little to low so my first round was pushed in a little deeper. Rest of loads were at right depth when I shot them the speed was actually faster than the Nosler book recipe even with less powder and it was cold outside using RE17. No signs of pressure but I still decide that was a sign that I need to actually lower the powder load even more but shot the round that was seated lower and it locked up my lever bolt it was really hard to open up. That lower seated bullet was just a touch lower but it really changed the pressure amount the primer was punctured.
 

jimbires

Handloader
Aug 16, 2011
2,390
207
for sure , just because it's published in a book does not mean it will work in all guns . we have way to many variables to deal with .
 
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