A different kind of rifle.

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,167
1,713
The attention to detail only enhances the beauty of the rifle. It is certainly elegant. It would be a delight even if all that ever happened was to hold it. How much more delight will it bring as it is used as it was meant to be used, to take game.
 

ShadeTree

Handloader
Mar 6, 2017
2,741
1,122
Thanks all for the kind words. I'll be shooting it for sure this yr. Don't know if I'll be hunting with it this yr or not. But of course once I get started shooting I likely wont want to stop. The hunting bug with it might come on pretty quickly.

Not that it matters as it wont be for sale in my lifetime, but for you flintlock afficionado's, what do you suppose a rifle like this is worth? I honestly have no idea.
 

Brinky72

Beginner
Jan 25, 2019
171
31
I know little about flint locks other than the basics. I did however work for a log buyer in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan who bought high end maple for veneer. He’d ship it to a mill in Ohio where it was cut either on a slicer or a lathe of sorts. From there to Germany for dashboards on high end cars and such. At any rate that’s as good of a stick of maple as you’ll find that’s on your rifle. Surprised your buddy got it and likely only did due to some defect in the log within eight feet that rendered it undesirable to a log buyer. I watched my buddy who I worked for spend over $90 k on a single log of birdseye maple back in ‘96. That is a purdy rifle and I wouldn’t be afraid to use it. Just keep your powder dry. Enjoy
 

ShadeTree

Handloader
Mar 6, 2017
2,741
1,122
I know little about flint locks other than the basics. I did however work for a log buyer in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan who bought high end maple for veneer. He’d ship it to a mill in Ohio where it was cut either on a slicer or a lathe of sorts. From there to Germany for dashboards on high end cars and such. At any rate that’s as good of a stick of maple as you’ll find that’s on your rifle. Surprised your buddy got it and likely only did due to some defect in the log within eight feet that rendered it undesirable to a log buyer. I watched my buddy who I worked for spend over $90 k on a single log of birdseye maple back in ‘96. That is a purdy rifle and I wouldn’t be afraid to use it. Just keep your powder dry. Enjoy
He did tell me that wood alone could cost $600 off of a stock maker.

He has 2 different local mills keeping an eye out for any maple logs with some desirable grain in them and he just pays a little more than what they have in them to get them there. It's all just wood to them so they're happy enough to make some money before they touch the log. Either way they are just gonna get cut up for the finished product no matter what they are. So it mades sense to sell them to him. Heck, one is a pallet shop, so any nice logs he bought off of them over the yrs was just gonna end up in pallets. He did get an unusual Ash log off the 1 mill that he made a nice rifle for himself with. I know the gentleman well that owns the property that log came from.
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,355
652
That’s a beautiful rifle. Man, what a neat build. Can’t wait to hear how it shoots for you.
 

Darkhorse

Handloader
Mar 14, 2014
747
18
How much is it worth? I would guess in the range of $1,500. to $2,000. More if someone is really taken by it. There is no carving on the rifle which will bring the value down. But since it was your friends rifle and you will hunt with it then it is worth much more to you. A few cold mornings and maybe a buck down and you will learn to cherish it.
Your friend knows his rifles. I have built 2 Isacc Haines rifles, a .54, and a .40, the .40 is my turkey rifle and it has killed several. The Isacc Haines stock fits me really well, I hope it does the same for you.
And talk about that wood!!! That curl really pops. One of the best stocks I've seen.
I wax all my guns now. I use regular Johnson's paste wax. I've used it on some guns for over 10 years and it really prevents the rust and adds a sheen to the stock. Before season I apply a generous coat to all surfaces wood and metal, under the barrel also. When you come in from hunting just rub your rifle down with a soft cotton cloth until all prints and smudges go away, then your rifle is ready to hunt.
 

ShadeTree

Handloader
Mar 6, 2017
2,741
1,122
How much is it worth? I would guess in the range of $1,500. to $2,000. More if someone is really taken by it. There is no carving on the rifle which will bring the value down. But since it was your friends rifle and you will hunt with it then it is worth much more to you. A few cold mornings and maybe a buck down and you will learn to cherish it.
Your friend knows his rifles. I have built 2 Isacc Haines rifles, a .54, and a .40, the .40 is my turkey rifle and it has killed several. The Isacc Haines stock fits me really well, I hope it does the same for you.
And talk about that wood!!! That curl really pops. One of the best stocks I've seen.
I wax all my guns now. I use regular Johnson's paste wax. I've used it on some guns for over 10 years and it really prevents the rust and adds a sheen to the stock. Before season I apply a generous coat to all surfaces wood and metal, under the barrel also. When you come in from hunting just rub your rifle down with a soft cotton cloth until all prints and smudges go away, then your rifle is ready to hunt.

Thanks. I was at his place the other day and he had 4 stock blanks cut out. The one I dare say might put mine to shame. Hard to say until it's cut to finished stock shape and got color on it what all it will end up displaying, but man oh man did that piece have a lot of stuff going on with it. I asked him if he was keeping it for himself and he said it's already sold and going down the road just as it is.
 
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