Need a 7mm cartridge

Yoteklr

Work, load, shoot, hunt, repeat
Apr 19, 2022
95
140
I think this is your best bet. You have the brass and will fit the 3.5” limit. Just expand and load , no worries of fire-forming. The right powder and barrel length will easily out run a 7mm Rem Mag.
Lol, I was just searching for 7mm Wby brass in stock....nothing.
I have no problems forming them from 270wby. I have to break in the barrel anyway.
I really believe this is the closest thing to what I want. Its about 75gr powder capacity and I won't feel like I'm wasting a long action by running a short cartridge.
Thanks.
 

desertcj

Handloader
Sep 27, 2010
840
82
I have a 7mm rem mag on a savage long action. It's throated long for 180ge Eld-Ms at 3.450" and it's a beast...relatively speaking. I get 3000fps with a 26" barrel which is far above any data you would find in a manual. If you're looking for something new, I'd probably look at a long throated 7mm prc or 28 Nosler. I haven't looked into it as I'm happy with my 7 rem mag, but I'm guessing that you could form 28 Nosler brass from 300 prc or 300 ultra mag to get better brass?
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,416
813
the 7mm mashburn would be pushing the 3.500" coal limit . the Mashburn has about the same water case capacity as the 7mm LRM . the Mashburn will run with the STW . the STW will have trouble with the 3.500" coal limit . I think sammi length is 3.6xx" for the STW . the LRM had a problem with poor brass quality , I'm not sure if that's solved . the Mashburn is formed from 300 win brass . everyone sells 300 win brass .
I run the 175 AccuBond LR bullets at 3.500" . 76.5 grains of H1000 gives 3145 FPS .
I run the 175 sierra SBT bullets at 3.415" . 71.6 grains of H1000 gives me 3000 FPS .
I'm pretty sure Scotty has his throat a little longer than I have mine .

if you're not worried about a wildcat cartridge , have you looked at the Shermans ? Rich Sherman has a few different 7mm's . he has brass with the correct headstamp , no die forming , or fire forming . he has die sets . it would be an easy one to work with . the only down side I can see is , I " THINK " Rich has all the stuff tied up . you would have to buy everything through him .
I went with the 7mm Mashburn a few times. If 3.5 is your max it's really as easy as getting the rifle chambered and having your smith throat the rifle for the bullet you intend to use. I wouldn't sweat a 3.5" magazine on a Mashburn too much. Warren Page used a 7 Mashburn to kill alot of animals with that rifle constrained to about 3.4"..

I went with the Mashburn since I enjoy using great brass like ADG, Lapua, RWS, etc for my rifles and when the Nosler came out all that was available was Nosler and it doesn't do the best for me. The new 7 PRC will be good to, once someone other than Hornady makes brass.

When I had my latest Mashburn built, I specc'ed it to touch a 175 ABLR at 3.6" which is max mag length, knowing it would likely shoot best at least 50 off the lands it works like a champ, and shoots like a dream.

Nosler rounds are excellent but they can be a touchy deal getting feeding to be excellent the little extra speed they make is more than made up with a little more BC in most cases.
 

Rem Jim

Handloader
Jan 7, 2012
676
1
My Brother just had a Sako A7 rebarreled ( 24.5 " ) and chambered in 7 MM PRC ! He got RCC brass - Loaded up RL26 with 175 Bergers and obtained a bit over 3100 fps without Pressure signs ! Excellent ! The New AGE 7 MM Mag ! jmo RJ
 

Darkhorse

Handloader
Mar 14, 2014
757
33
In 1981 I bought my dream rifle. I was in my 20's, what did I know about rifles? But still, I got what I wanted and not for a moment have I
regretted what I bought. It was a Model 700 lefthand in 7mm Remington Magnum. You couldn't open a Guns & Ammo or outdoor life
without reading about the 7mm Magnum or the .44 Magnum. (I got a couple of those too) But that old 7mm Magnum is just special to me. It's my favorite caliber.
A couple of times a year I'll take it out when I go to shoot. I always take a shot or two without ear protection, it just feels different like that. It gives me a feeling of power.
A few years ago I decided to hunt with it again and took it out of the safe and found I couldn't sight it in, bullets just hit all over. Turned out the forend of the stock had warped and was putting pressure against the barrel. I opened up the stock and glass bedded the action and 2.0 inches of the barrel starting at the recoil lug. I removed the trigger assy., took it all apart and touched it up here and there. Then set it a hair under 3.0 pounds and took it to the range. Well it beat me up pretty bad that old recoil pad had turned hard as a rock.
So I ordered a limbsaver recoil pad put it on and went back to the range. That pad really softened it up. Before I could hardly shoot 20 rounds, now I was shooting as much as I wanted.
I killed my first elk with that rifle. One shot, offhand, at 269 yards shooting my handloads using a 175 grain speer grand slam bullet. Before my last elk hunt I bought a 300 Win. Mag. and shot another bull. Sure it has more power, a little more speed. But it didn't seem to kill that much better than my old 7mm did. But now it was a shooter! Before it shot groups just under an inch. Now both those rifles shoot around .500"
The 7mm magnum is still my favorite caliber and the Model 700 BDL stock remains a beauty.
I wouldn't be in a big hurry to rebarrel a rifle with another caliber, I know it would be a mistake for me.
Same barreled action, same stock. If anything I would restock that rifle and maybe refinish the old stock. You can only have one favorite rifle and for me it's the Remington Model 700 in 7mm Remington Magnum.
 

Darkhorse

Handloader
Mar 14, 2014
757
33
In 1981 I bought my dream rifle. I was in my 20's, what did I know about rifles? But still, I got what I wanted and not for a moment have I
regretted what I bought. It was a Model 700 lefthand in 7mm Remington Magnum. You couldn't open a Guns & Ammo or outdoor life
without reading about the 7mm Magnum or the .44 Magnum. (I got a couple of those too) But that old 7mm Magnum is just special to me. It's my favorite caliber.
A couple of times a year I'll take it out when I go to shoot. I always take a shot or two without ear protection, it just feels different like that. It gives me a feeling of power.
A few years ago I decided to hunt with it again and took it out of the safe and found I couldn't sight it in, bullets just hit all over. Turned out the forend of the stock had warped and was putting pressure against the barrel. I opened up the stock and glass bedded the action and 2.0 inches of the barrel starting at the recoil lug. I removed the trigger assy., took it all apart and touched it up here and there. Then set it a hair under 3.0 pounds and took it to the range. Well it beat me up pretty bad that old recoil pad had turned hard as a rock.
So I ordered a limbsaver recoil pad put it on and went back to the range. That pad really softened it up. Before I could hardly shoot 20 rounds, now I was shooting as much as I wanted.
I killed my first elk with that rifle. One shot, offhand, at 269 yards shooting my handloads using a 175 grain speer grand slam bullet. Before my last elk hunt I bought a 300 Win. Mag. and shot another bull. Sure it has more power, a little more speed. But it didn't seem to kill that much better than my old 7mm did. But now it was a shooter! Before it shot groups just under an inch. Now both those rifles shoot around .500"
The 7mm magnum is still my favorite caliber and the Model 700 BDL stock remains a beauty.
I wouldn't be in a big hurry to rebarrel a rifle with another caliber, I know it would be a mistake for me.
Same barreled action, same stock. If anything I would restock that rifle and maybe refinish the old stock. You can only have one favorite rifle and for me it's the Remington Model 700 in 7mm Remington Magnum.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,734
2,730
In 1981 I bought my dream rifle. I was in my 20's, what did I know about rifles? But still, I got what I wanted and not for a moment have I
regretted what I bought. It was a Model 700 lefthand in 7mm Remington Magnum. You couldn't open a Guns & Ammo or outdoor life
without reading about the 7mm Magnum or the .44 Magnum. (I got a couple of those too) But that old 7mm Magnum is just special to me. It's my favorite caliber.
A couple of times a year I'll take it out when I go to shoot. I always take a shot or two without ear protection, it just feels different like that. It gives me a feeling of power.
A few years ago I decided to hunt with it again and took it out of the safe and found I couldn't sight it in, bullets just hit all over. Turned out the forend of the stock had warped and was putting pressure against the barrel. I opened up the stock and glass bedded the action and 2.0 inches of the barrel starting at the recoil lug. I removed the trigger assy., took it all apart and touched it up here and there. Then set it a hair under 3.0 pounds and took it to the range. Well it beat me up pretty bad that old recoil pad had turned hard as a rock.
So I ordered a limbsaver recoil pad put it on and went back to the range. That pad really softened it up. Before I could hardly shoot 20 rounds, now I was shooting as much as I wanted.
I killed my first elk with that rifle. One shot, offhand, at 269 yards shooting my handloads using a 175 grain speer grand slam bullet. Before my last elk hunt I bought a 300 Win. Mag. and shot another bull. Sure it has more power, a little more speed. But it didn't seem to kill that much better than my old 7mm did. But now it was a shooter! Before it shot groups just under an inch. Now both those rifles shoot around .500"
The 7mm magnum is still my favorite caliber and the Model 700 BDL stock remains a beauty.
I wouldn't be in a big hurry to rebarrel a rifle with another caliber, I know it would be a mistake for me.
Same barreled action, same stock. If anything I would restock that rifle and maybe refinish the old stock. You can only have one favorite rifle and for me it's the Remington Model 700 in 7mm Remington Magnum.
My 7RM (Winchester Featherweight) is one of my favourite rifles. It was the first one I picked up in Canada, and it has been used on quite a lot of game. My load was a 175 grain Speer MagTip and later a 175 grain Trophy Bonded Bear Claw. I tamed it with a good recoil pad early on. I still have the rifle and take it out about once a year. I do love it as a cartridge that'll do about anything I need here in NA, though I have a good number of rifles since that one. I really enjoyed reading your account.
 
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