45-70 Range Report

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,416
811
Woodycreek":1s9wo2ej said:
Thanks Jim but i have been wanting one for sometime so it may be to late :lol:

You might as well be on your way to the store! They are a great rifle. Scotty
 

HeathSexton

Handloader
May 12, 2006
1,196
8
JD338":3p6hj0jt said:
Woodycreek":3p6hj0jt said:
ROGER THAT! I will never turn down shooting someone else rifle and ammo :lol:

Brian,

Be forwarned, Marlinitis is non curable. The only way to ease the symptoms is to buy, buy, buy! the 45-70 is addictive!

FWIW, I shot a 5 shot group with my 338 RUM at 300 yds that went 2" but I was excited lobing those 45-70 bullets at that distance!

You have been officially forwarned! :grin:

JD338

JD speaks the truth, I was always a bolt guy until I got a 336 .35 Rem and then an 1895G. Now the first thing I look for in a gun shop is the levers, then the revolvers, I need more lever guns I only have 5.

I also only have 2 45/70's, I think a man really needs 3. One for each hand and then a back-up just in case.
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,416
811
HeathSexton":3264ln28 said:
JD338":3264ln28 said:
Woodycreek":3264ln28 said:
ROGER THAT! I will never turn down shooting someone else rifle and ammo :lol:

Brian,

Be forwarned, Marlinitis is non curable. The only way to ease the symptoms is to buy, buy, buy! the 45-70 is addictive!

FWIW, I shot a 5 shot group with my 338 RUM at 300 yds that went 2" but I was excited lobing those 45-70 bullets at that distance!

You have been officially forwarned! :grin:

JD338

JD speaks the truth, I was always a bolt guy until I got a 336 .35 Rem and then an 1895G. Now the first thing I look for in a gun shop is the levers, then the revolvers, I need more lever guns I only have 5.

I also only have 2 45/70's, I think a man really needs 3. One for each hand and then a back-up just in case.

This man speaks nothing but Gospel! Scotty
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,416
811
They are both in and the same to me. I think cases and such may be a touch cheaper (45-70), but speed for speed, they are both the same when loaded to similar pressures. I am going off data for Marlin 1895's and Win 1886's. 450 Marlin will appear to be better in some manuals but overall, the 45-70 holds the edge in powder capacity. I would get either. Scotty

PS. Since you are in a red flag condition, you might as well go check out the local gun shop!
 

HeathSexton

Handloader
May 12, 2006
1,196
8
I took the 45/70 route because you can read about all the cool stuff it did over 100 years ago like the Sandy Hook Test.
 

Woodycreek

Handloader
Aug 2, 2007
2,240
0
Scotty,

Don't know of any gun stores in Nags Head but if i find one i know where i will spend the rest of the day. Gave up surfing for the rest of the day and knocked out in the pool. Getting ready to go rip it up on some Go-carts :twisted:

Heath,

Sandy Hook Test?
 

HeathSexton

Handloader
May 12, 2006
1,196
8
"The new cartridge was completely identified as the .45-70-405, but was also commonly called the ".45 Government" cartridge in commercial catalogs. The nomenclature of the time was based on several properties of the cartridge:

.45 : nominal bullet diameter, in decimal inches i.e. 0.458 inches (11.4 mm)
70 : wt. of blackpowder charge, in grains i.e. 70 grains (4.5g)
405 : weight of lead bullet, in grains i.e. 405 grains (26.2 g)
The minimum acceptable accuracy of the .45-70 from the 1873 Springfield was approximately 4 inches (100 mm) at 100 yards (91 m), however, the heavy, slow-moving bullet had a "rainbow" trajectory, the bullet drop measured in multiple yards (meters) at ranges greater than a few hundred yards (meters). A skilled shooter, firing at known range, could consistently hit targets that were 6 × 6 feet (1.8 m) at 600 yards (550 m)—the Army standard target, and a skill mainly of value in mass or volley fire, since accurate aimed fire on a man-sized target was effective only to about 300 yards (270 m).

After the Sandy Hook tests of 1879, a new variation of the .45-70 cartridge was produced, the .45-70-500, which fired a heavier 500 grain (32.5 g) bullet. The heavier 500-grain (32 g) bullet produced significantly superior ballistics, and could reach ranges of 3,350 yards (3,120 m), which were beyond the maximum range of the .45-70-405. While the effective range of the .45-70 on individual targets was limited to about 1,000 yards (915 m) with either load, the heavier bullet would produce lethal injuries at 3,500 yards (3,200 m). At those ranges, the bullets struck point-first at roughly a 30 degree angle, penetrating 3 one inch (2.5 cm) thick oak boards, and then traveling to a depth of 8 inches (20 cm) into the sand of the Sandy Hook beach*. It was hoped the longer range of the .45-70-500 would allow effective volleyed fire at ranges beyond those normally expected of infantry fire."
 

SJB358

Ballistician
Dec 24, 2006
31,416
811
Yup, he is gone! Once he handles a few of them the fever will happen. I walked away, went back to work even. Well, I was back in the PX 2 hours later and out the door with the Marlin 20 minutes later! Scotty
 

Woodycreek

Handloader
Aug 2, 2007
2,240
0
And so to will the levergun fever pass when i get one :lol: My Glock fever has passed since i have all of the Glock .40s now. But i think i may get a Glock 10mm fever :shock:
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,715
2,683
One lever gun is never enough. It becomes mandatory to buy a new one occasionally just to hold the fever in check. Look at POP and his 356s. This is number two, and it likely won't be the last. Heaven forbid that he should ever lay hands on a 45-70!
 
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