Painted my Tikka .308's stock

Darkhorse

Handloader
Mar 14, 2014
757
33
I've had this rifle for a long time now, I can't find the bill of sale but I think I bought it around the second year they began importing them. I like it pretty well but there are a few things I don't care for....the bottom piece is plastic instead of metal....the LOP is too long with winter clothing on....and the plastic stock was slick as our Georgia red clay roads after a hard rain. It would slide against my cheek and hand when shooting offhand and it would move around when on sandbags, I never could get it too really lockdown like a wooden stock does. The Tikka is not my only synthetic stock but it is the only one that's this slick.
So I started thinking about painting it to make it a little more grabby. Did a lot of research, then just jumped right in.
The Tikka stock is notorius for being difficult to bed or paint because nothing sticks to it, so this is how I did it.
First thing was a good wipedown with alcohol. Then I removed the recoil pad and plastic filler and the sling studs. And started sanding. Most references say to use 220 grit but I used 100 grit, because I'm not after a smooth finish I'm after a rough finish, something that helps paint stick. I sanded it until all the slick black was off and the surface was gray and rough. Then a trip to the air compressor to blow everything off. Then another good wipe with a clean cloth and alcohol.
Now I'm wearing rubber gloves and outside with the stock hanging on a wire attached to a recoil pad screw. And another good wipedown with alcohol. After drying good it was time to paint. First was several light coats of a Primer/Paint mixture. This was a good rich satin brown. I took care not to let it run.
Two days later I sprayed several light coats of a textured brown paint and let it dry 48 hours. I didn't like it. The surface was just too gritty, it felt like 60 grit sandpaper. So I cut a piece of scuff pad and began to lightly sand the surface. First I took off the sharp points on the entire stock, then applying more pressure I sanded the really offending places, where my cheek contacts the stock, the wrist, and the forend. Now it felt a lot better, still plenty of good grip but nothing sharp now and the cheek, wrist and forend were very comfortable. Next another trip to the air compressor and a light wipedown with alcohol.
Lastly I sprayed several light coats of clear, matte topcoat.
For Camo I took a wadded up paper towel, sprayed a puddle of flat black on a piece of cardboard, dobbed the paper towel and blotted it on the surface.
I think it came out good for a rattle can paint job and fixed the slick surface problem.
Next I cut up some pipe insulation into small square chunks and filled the butt, and compressing the foam with a stick every few handfuls. Now most of that hollow drum sound is gone.
Now I've hunted with this rifle all of November and December, it just feels so much better in the hands now, and there is no sign that any of the paint wants to peel or flake off. Much better.
SS850131-1024x768.jpg
 

1Shot

Handloader
Dec 5, 2008
1,435
5
I figured out how to paint stocks like the USMC digit-camo. I ruff up the stock with some sand paper then spray the whole stock with a flat sand color and let it dry over night. Then I take a plastic needle point mat that they sale at Wal-Mart in the sewing section. It is a mat made up of little squares. I lay it on the stock and using a swiping motion spray flat green streaks at different angles and let it dry. Then come back and do the same with flat black to shade in areas between the green streaks and sand color spots. This has lasted really well for a number of years on three rifles and a Contender Pistol forearm I have done.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,465
2,246
Darkhorse,

That came out looking very nice. It does appear that you solved the problem with which you were confronted. Good looking job.
 

gbflyer

Handloader
Mar 28, 2017
914
88
1Shot":xmn9fm7a said:
I figured out how to paint stocks like the USMC digit-camo. I ruff up the stock with some sand paper then spray the whole stock with a flat sand color and let it dry over night. Then I take a plastic needle point mat that they sale at Wal-Mart in the sewing section. It is a mat made up of little squares. I lay it on the stock and using a swiping motion spray flat green streaks at different angles and let it dry. Then come back and do the same with flat black to shade in areas between the green streaks and sand color spots. This has lasted really well for a number of years on three rifles and a Contender Pistol forearm I have done.

Neat. I’d like to see that.
 

coop22250

Beginner
Nov 23, 2018
208
0
I have a couple HS precision stocks that’s are spiderweb, I’m planning on doing the manners style camo. My wife looked at me mighty funny when I asked if she had any natural sponges for a painting project haha.


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35 Whelen

Handloader
Dec 22, 2011
2,075
7
The Tikka T3 has to be one of the worst out there for"slipperyness" they addressed this somewhat with the
T3x model much better in the grip panels! Alot more aggressive in that respect. The T3x buttstock is also injected with form to cure that hollow sound. So Tikka was certainly aware of all this. Probably one of the best buys in bang for buck out there. (If you want to exclude the T/C Venture). Your paint job looks good, lets hope it gives years of service.
 

hunter24605

Handloader
Apr 30, 2016
1,617
1,501
Nice work..As much as I like my T3, I also found it slippery..I ended up going with an aftermarket laminate stock with plenty of stippling. Solved the issue, but it gained some weight.
 
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