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Ridge_Runner

Handloader
Sep 29, 2006
1,342
621
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9.5" beard/1" spurs/18# 10 oz
and a limbhanger
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10.25" beard/1.25" spurs/ 20# on the dot
 
our turkeys near me was always fed well by my grandmother. in the mornings while feeding the horses I'd throw out a scoop of mixes feed (oats, corn, molasses and other goodies). some days the turkeys would almost jump in the back of the feed truck. people always liked hunting on us due to the WELL fed birds. you got a good sized 1 for sure.
 
Excellent gobblers! Congratulations on taking a pair of great birds. I will echo Mr.Mike - stories please!
 
Was a frustrating season, the limbhanger made the 20th gobbler I set up on, but it was multiple gobblers every time till then, was 2 weeks into season, had called 3 gobblers in a bunch across a small field, a pair of eagles ran them off. 2 days later a pair of gobblers were coming to the call and once again were assaulted by the eagles. That nest has been active for 7-8 years and never before of the dozen or so turkeys I have taken there, did the eagles bother them.
So changed areas and found a group of 3 gobblers sounding off. Some aggressive calling on an enticer wet slate call and I saw them coming at 125 yards. Got the franchi 20 ga. On them and dumped the lead gobbler at 30 yards.
Hunted a few more mornings, heard a bunch of gobblers, alot of gobbling but seems they ignored hen calling but gobbled their fool heads off at each other, was getting mad and frustrated, then it hit me.
I had seen this before, 25 years ago, so I dug through my bucket of calls and found a primos gobbler shaker call, put it in my vest and came up with a plan.
The most vocal gobbler I had heard that week was the target, I knew where his strutting lane was, instead of taking my normal approach from the west, I came in from the south, at 1/4 mile from his strut zone I made a fly down cackle, heard nothing, a series of loud yelps, nothing. Shook the gobbler tube and heard a faint gobble.
Moved in 125-150 yards closer shook it again and he immediately responded. I closed the distance some more and found a place to hide in the fork of a big downed oak tree.
Shook the tube and he gobbled closer, I immediately gobbled twice and he cut off the second gobble with is own double, so I cut him off with a gobble threw the call aside looked through the FF3 and saw him coming at 60 yards. At 35 yards I sent a 2 oz load of #9 TSS into his face. He never moved, just done a back flip, and laid there with his fan spread and his back feathers standing up.
 
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Quaker Boy makes a gobble shaker call that mimics a challenging Jake, I've never used one, but reliable sources say it does great at unlocking gobblers.
 
Was a frustrating season, the limbhanger made the 20th gobbler I set up on, but it was multiple gobblers every time till then, was 2 weeks into season, had called 3 gobblers in a bunch across a small field, a pair of eagles ran them off. 2 days later a pair of gobblers were coming to the call and once again were assaulted by the eagles. That nest has been active for 7-8 years and never before of the dozen or so turkeys I have taken there, did the eagles bother them.
So changed areas and found a group of 3 gobblers sounding off. Some aggressive calling on an enticer wet slate call and I saw them coming at 125 yards. Got the franchi 20 ga. On them and dumped the lead gobbler at 30 yards.
Hunted a few more mornings, heard a bunch of gobblers, alot of gobbling but seems they ignored hen calling but gobbled their fool heads off at each other, was getting mad and frustrated, then it hit me.
I had seen this before, 25 years ago, so I dug through my bucket of calls and found a primos gobbler shaker call, put it in my vest and came up with a plan.
The most vocal gobbler I had heard that week was the target, I knew where his strutting lane was, instead of taking my normal approach from the west, I came in from the south, at 1/4 mile from his strut zone I made a fly down cackle, heard nothing, a series of loud yelps, nothing. Shook the gobbler tube and heard a faint gobble.
Moved in 125-150 yards closer shook it again and he immediately responded. I closed the distance some more and found a place to hide in the fork of a big downed oak tree.
Shook the tube and he gobbled closer, I immediately gobbled twice and he cut off the second gobble with is own double, so I cut him off with a gobble threw the call aside looked through the FF3 and saw him coming at 60 yards. At 35 yards I sent a 2 oz load of #9 TSS into his face. He never moved, just done a back flip, and laid there with his fan spread and his back feathers standing up.
Now, that's hunting! Exciting account of the reality of turkey hunting.
 
Was a frustrating season, the limbhanger made the 20th gobbler I set up on, but it was multiple gobblers every time till then, was 2 weeks into season, had called 3 gobblers in a bunch across a small field, a pair of eagles ran them off. 2 days later a pair of gobblers were coming to the call and once again were assaulted by the eagles. That nest has been active for 7-8 years and never before of the dozen or so turkeys I have taken there, did the eagles bother them.
So changed areas and found a group of 3 gobblers sounding off. Some aggressive calling on an enticer wet slate call and I saw them coming at 125 yards. Got the franchi 20 ga. On them and dumped the lead gobbler at 30 yards.
Hunted a few more mornings, heard a bunch of gobblers, alot of gobbling but seems they ignored hen calling but gobbled their fool heads off at each other, was getting mad and frustrated, then it hit me.
I had seen this before, 25 years ago, so I dug through my bucket of calls and found a primos gobbler shaker call, put it in my vest and came up with a plan.
The most vocal gobbler I had heard that week was the target, I knew where his strutting lane was, instead of taking my normal approach from the west, I came in from the south, at 1/4 mile from his strut zone I made a fly down cackle, heard nothing, a series of loud yelps, nothing. Shook the gobbler tube and heard a faint gobble.
Moved in 125-150 yards closer shook it again and he immediately responded. I closed the distance some more and found a place to hide in the fork of a big downed oak tree.
Shook the tube and he gobbled closer, I immediately gobbled twice and he cut off the second gobble with is own double, so I cut him off with a gobble threw the call aside looked through the FF3 and saw him coming at 60 yards. At 35 yards I sent a 2 oz load of #9 TSS into his face. He never moved, just done a back flip, and laid there with his fan spread and his back feathers standing up.
Great story, your perseverance, patience, and ability to adapt to the conditions contributed to your success. Congratulations, again.
 
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