First time posting and a new Tikka T3x lite in .308

Wolfshead

Beginner
Feb 5, 2022
30
47
I have just purchased a Tikka T3x Lite compact in .308.
It is a 20” barrel with a 1-10 twist.
I have available to me 150 gn Accubonds and IMR 4064.
I am in the process of load development, and the Nosler data say 44 grains min to 48 grains max.
It also states that 44 grains was the most accurate.
I realize that my rifle is a bit different than the one that was used in the testing being that it is only 20”
Does anyone have any experience with these bullets and this powder out of a 308?
Would love to hear what you have.

I handload for a 30-06 using the same bullets and powder. Just a little bit different in a short action case.
 

TackDriver284

Handloader
Feb 13, 2016
1,932
722
Welcome to the forum, 44 is the min and 48 is the max with 4064 as shown in the Nosler manual, once you get to 46 grains ( 103 % case fill ) you will see the case start filling to the neck and maybe mid neck once you go to the max charges. I don't really pay much attention to the asterisk where it says " Most Accurate load", all rifles will shoot differently. I would just work up in 3 round charges in .3 grain increments from 44.5 to 47 grains, if you have room for 48 grains ( 107 % case fill ) , then go for it but work up and watch for pressure signs. Keep in mind, you will feel a powder crunch once you get up to the max charges. A drop tube will help settle the powder more evenly in the case. IMR 4064 is a great powder, I have used it back in the days before I settled with Varget.
 

Wolfshead

Beginner
Feb 5, 2022
30
47
Welcome to the forum, 44 is the min and 48 is the max with 4064 as shown in the Nosler manual, once you get to 46 grains ( 103 % case fill ) you will see the case start filling to the neck and maybe mid neck once you go to the max charges. I don't really pay much attention to the asterisk where it says " Most Accurate load", all rifles will shoot differently. I would just work up in 3 round charges in .3 grain increments from 44.5 to 47 grains, if you have room for 48 grains ( 107 % case fill ) , then go for it but work up and watch for pressure signs. Keep in mind, you will feel a powder crunch once you get up to the max charges. A drop tube will help settle the powder more evenly in the case. IMR 4064 is a great powder, I have used it back in the days before I settled with Varget.
Thank you!
This helps.
I would love to go with Varget but i can’t find any anywhere and it seems that nowadays it is but a legend.
 

hunter24605

Handloader
Apr 30, 2016
1,803
1,951
Welcome aboard. Good news is the 308 has proven to be easy to find an accurate load with most of the appropriate powders. You should be able to find a decent load with with 4064. Case fill may cause a hiccup in development, but a long drop tube is going to be your friend. If you can’t get what you’re looking for and you happen to see Reloder 15, give it a try. It’s what I use in two different 308’s, and it pops up quite often for sale. The AccuBond is going to perform, no doubt.
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,742
2,749
Welcome aboard. Pleased to see your question. You'll find a wealth of knowledge here, just as has already been demonstrated.
 

wvbuckbuster

Handloader
Nov 5, 2015
1,673
858
Welcome. Good folks here who are willing to share their wealth of information. As others have stated the 308 is easy to load for with many powders. The 150 AB is a good bullet and have used it in different calibers. It will come together for you. Good shooting, Dan.
 

salmonchaser

Handloader
Dec 13, 2013
3,744
1,512
Welcome aboard. Also a great fan of 4064. I augmented my training budget with hand loads for my 308. I also had very good luck with Varget If you happen to find any on the shelf. I also found that pushing for velocity increases with a 308 never generated great results. With three different rifles I had my most consistent results at about 2650/2700 fps.
Good luck
 

xphunter

Handloader
Sep 15, 2005
581
946
Welcome!
Don't worry about that barrel being short when it comes to loading manuals, and the powder options and the amount. Just find the load your barrel likes and go kill stuff.
Most of my barrels are shorter than 20 inches, and they do not lack in the accuracy department.
 

Wolfshead

Beginner
Feb 5, 2022
30
47
Thank you all for the replies AND welcome!
I use the OCW method of load development, mostly because I do not have a chronograph or access to one.
It has worked well for me with my 30-06 so that’s what I do.
My concern was with the data stating that 44 grains was the most accurate load for that powder and using the OCW I may miss that with it being the starting load.
I’m open to new things but my current financial situation and equipment have me limited.
Thanks again!
 

xphunter

Handloader
Sep 15, 2005
581
946
Thank you all for the replies AND welcome!
I use the OCW method of load development, mostly because I do not have a chronograph or access to one.
It has worked well for me with my 30-06 so that’s what I do.
My concern was with the data stating that 44 grains was the most accurate load for that powder and using the OCW I may miss that with it being the starting load.
I’m open to new things but my current financial situation and equipment have me limited.
Thanks again!
You will do fine by loading the way you have been-Looking forward to the range report.
308's seem to be easy to find a good load for. Every once in awhile you will get one that is finicky.
I had three of them until a month ago, and sold one of my XP-100's as they were too close to each other in function.
I use Varget for my 30" F-TR rifle, with 200.20X Berger's, an H-4895 for my 15.75" center-grip XP-100 with 155 grain Hornady A-Max's.
 

lhsako

Handloader
Jan 12, 2012
616
36
The .308 bolt gun with a 20" tube and the 150 grain bullet is the classic "woods rifle" for whitetail. Nible and potent!
Welcome to the board.
 

PJGunner

Handloader
Dec 11, 2010
1,893
543
"The .308 bolt gun with a 20" tube and the 150 grain bullet is the classic "woods rifle" for whitetail. Nible and potent!"

I agree but you are shortchanging the cartridge. I got my first .308 back in 1973. A Remington 660 with 20" Barrel. I worked up a very stiff load using H335 and the 150 gr. Sierra Pro-Hunter. A very bright muzzle flash and a loud booming report when you touched one off. I have no idea what the velocity was but it would reach out and touch something. That something was a 250 pound Mule Deer buck as 426 paces. One shot and one dead deer.

Years later, a deer hunt in the Kaibab National Forest of Arizona, another Mule Deer facing me staight on. One shot at 250 yards, laser measured. Bullet was the 165 gr. Speer Hot Core spitzer over a charge of W760. Rifle was the Ruger RSI with 18.5" barrel.

Frankly, my preference in the .308, regardless of barrel length, would be something in 165 gr. weight. I've had excellent results with the above mentioned Speer bullet. I wouldn't be surprised if the AccuBond and pation, or Hornady's version wouldn't work just as well, although I believe I'd reserve the AccuBond and Partition to bigger stuff like a Black Bear or elk. I don't think they're necessary for deer but if you like them, go for it.

FWIW, a comment on the 165 gr. AccuBond. My normal elk rifle is a .35 Whelen shooting the 225 gr. Barnes TSX bullet at 2710 FPS. Flattens elk like the hammer of Thor. On one of my elks hunts, while checking the sights on the .35W, the crosshair in the scope went kaput. Gone. Not a hair in sight. Back up rifle was a custom with 1 in 12" barrel that will not shoot a bullet heavier than 165 gr. for some reason but is dead nuts accurate with the 165 gr. AccuBond. My load does 2880 FPS according to my chronograph and I could most likely kick it up a lot higher. It's just that's the level I'd reached and no time to work further prior to the hunt. Well, long story short got a crack at a nice juicy cow and one shot with the old 06 put her down after a 30 yards run. Never did find the bullet but I would have no fear usung it on elk.BTW, that hunt was a meat hunt. I wasn't looking for a trophy.
Paul B.
 

NYDAN

Handloader
Sep 17, 2013
1,400
496
Welcome to the forum. This is a great place with great people who share a wealth of information. Good luck with the .308. Dan
 

ShadeTree

Handloader
Mar 6, 2017
3,133
2,114
Welcome aboard. I can't offer you concrete advice on the 308 but many on here can. I do know it does well with Varget, and 4064 is right there on burn rate. I can't imagine in a Tikka you will have problems finding a accurate load with a well-behaved cartridge like a 308.
 

Wolfshead

Beginner
Feb 5, 2022
30
47
Thank you all again for your replies and expertise.
It really truly is greatly appreciated.
I have been back to the range and here’s the low down.
I was able to get a couple of pounds of Varget from a person on another forum who lives near me.
Very fortunate there and a really nice guy.
After looking at the data from various sources, Barnes, Lyman, Hodgdon, Hornady and Nosler, I decided to use Nosler’s data.
Started at 42.5 grains their min, added 2% to get the next three loads. Then added .3 grains to get one measure over the max load of 46.5
Load weights were
42.5
43.4
44.2 these three are the sighters.
3 rounds each of the following
45.1
45.4
45.7
46.0
46.3
46.6
I struggle reading the results of OCW but I’m going to add what I have and my thoughts.
Im shooting a Tikka T3x lite compact with a 20” barrel.
Shooting 150 grain Nosler Accubonds and Nosler cases.
Hodgdon Varget powder
CCI #200 primers
111 yds because that what my range has set up.
Sun and clouds west wind at 90degrees to target 8-10 mph, 67-71 degrees.

As you look at the target please note that the top right circle is #6 and 46.6 grains
I know it is confusing. I should have put it together better and then labeled it different but it is what it is….sorry about that.

I feel that 45.4 the scatter node as it is poi low and before the poi shift which would make it the scatter node? And it is 1.5 grains from 46.0 which I believe is OCW? because it is a relatively tight group in comparison to the other groups and, the next group of 46.3 triangulates the poi of 46.0 which is also an indicator of OCW?
Also have another scatter node at 46.6 which is 1.5% higher than 45.9 or (46.0).
That is how I understand it.
Please let me know if you agree or if you see it differently than I do. 26A3FDFE-78E5-4061-A781-EB460CDBC4DB.jpeg
 

DrMike

Ballistician
Nov 8, 2006
35,742
2,749
Were I working with this rifle and the propellant/bullet variants you have available, I'd focus on the 46.0 and/or the 46.3 charge. That is pretty much what you said, and I'm in substantial agreement with you. I'd likely lean toward the 46.3 grain charge as the triangular impact tends to be more comforting when looking for accuracy, in my experience. You can play with seating depth which should result in being able to tighten up your group. You've done a good job of determining where to go with this load.
 

RL338

Handloader
Mar 23, 2017
1,171
1,411
I would lean towards 46grs.
If you believe in Dan’s OCW with 3% between nodes , both my 308s are smoking hot with a 43.3gr load of Varget behind 150gr SPs. This load was developed with my Rem. 7400.
The math 43.3 + 3% = 44.6 + 3% = 45.9
 

lhsako

Handloader
Jan 12, 2012
616
36
"The .308 bolt gun with a 20" tube and the 150 grain bullet is the classic "woods rifle" for whitetail. Nible and potent!"

I agree but you are shortchanging the cartridge. I got my first .308 back in 1973. A Remington 660 with 20" Barrel. I worked up a very stiff load using H335 and the 150 gr. Sierra Pro-Hunter. A very bright muzzle flash and a loud booming report when you touched one off. I have no idea what the velocity was but it would reach out and touch something. That something was a 250 pound Mule Deer buck as 426 paces. One shot and one dead deer.

Years later, a deer hunt in the Kaibab National Forest of Arizona, another Mule Deer facing me staight on. One shot at 250 yards, laser measured. Bullet was the 165 gr. Speer Hot Core spitzer over a charge of W760. Rifle was the Ruger RSI with 18.5" barrel.

Frankly, my preference in the .308, regardless of barrel length, would be something in 165 gr. weight. I've had excellent results with the above mentioned Speer bullet. I wouldn't be surprised if the AccuBond and pation, or Hornady's version wouldn't work just as well, although I believe I'd reserve the AccuBond and Partition to bigger stuff like a Black Bear or elk. I don't think they're necessary for deer but if you like them, go for it.

FWIW, a comment on the 165 gr. AccuBond. My normal elk rifle is a .35 Whelen shooting the 225 gr. Barnes TSX bullet at 2710 FPS. Flattens elk like the hammer of Thor. On one of my elks hunts, while checking the sights on the .35W, the crosshair in the scope went kaput. Gone. Not a hair in sight. Back up rifle was a custom with 1 in 12" barrel that will not shoot a bullet heavier than 165 gr. for some reason but is dead nuts accurate with the 165 gr. AccuBond. My load does 2880 FPS according to my chronograph and I could most likely kick it up a lot higher. It's just that's the level I'd reached and no time to work further prior to the hunt. Well, long story short got a crack at a nice juicy cow and one shot with the old 06 put her down after a 30 yards run. Never did find the bullet but I would have no fear usung it on elk.BTW, that hunt was a meat hunt. I wasn't looking for a trophy.
Paul B.
Its a specific weapon where handling, quick shots and ability to get on target quickly make the difference between success and failure. A little more velocity is insignificant by comparison. 150 Ballistic tips is what my buddy used very effectively.
 
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